Clothing and textile manufacturing's environmental impact

At Glenforest, we believe prolonging garment life is a key step in achieving true sustainability in the fashion industry. Our cleaning and finishing methods are designed with maximizing the life of your favourite garments in mind. This article speaks to this importance. 

Clothing and textile manufacturing's environmental impact and how to shop more ethically

ABC Science

Updated 2 April 2018 at 8:26 pm
First posted 2 April 2018 at 8:09 pm

The shirt you're wearing right now: what's it made from? In its rawest form, was it once growing in a field, on a sheep's back or sloshing at the bottom of an oil well?

We wear clothes literally every day, but few of us spend much time reflecting on what goes into manufacturing various textiles and their environmental impacts.

This is interesting considering how much we think about the food we eat or the skin care products we use.

Most of us don't realise how environmentally intensive it is to make a single article of clothing, says fashion sustainability expert Clara Vuletich, whose PhD research focuses on sustainable textiles.

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